Curtain and Drape Headings- Top Tips

There are many types of curtain and drape headings and they are created, usually, by the application of a heading tape and a draw cord. Here is a quick look at the most common ones.

Standard

The most common form of curtain heading is the standard one. It comprises of a one inch tape that is gathered up into a narrow, even heading. This is most often used for informal curtains and in hidden areas, under valences and behind pelmets for instance. When employing this method of curtain heading on net curtains or sheer, lightweight drapes a synthetic tape is available thus ensuring that a reinforced curtain rod is not required.

The standard form of curtain heading is generally used on dormer windows and cottage windows. It only uses one and a half times the width of the curtain and so is extremely economical on materials

Pencil Pleat

The pencil pleat is employed where there is no valance or pelmet and it gives a pleasant finish at the curtain header. Most interior decorating styles will be enhanced by this form of drape heading, especially modern ones. Remember to allow about two and half times the width of the window in fabric to allow the pleats to present themselves nicely.

French Pleat

This style of curtain heading is sometimes referred to as the french pleat. It is often used with extra stiffener in the fabric to produce full, regular folds in heavy fabric, velvet for instance. As with the pencil pleat it is important to allow at least two and a half times the width of the window in fabric to allow the pleats to achieve their fullness and to give a pleasing effect. The pleats are usually fanned across the window and have a button sewn to the bottom of each one.

Cartridge Pleat

This is often called a goblet pleat and takes it’s name from the goblet shape that is formed in the top of each pleat. This shape is held by stuffing polyester or tissue paper into the top of each pole to help the curtain retain it’s shape. It is most usually used in formal settings where the curtains are full length and have a very formal feel to them.

Slot Pleat

As the name suggests this is simply a pleat formed by cutting slots in a cased header tape to feed a pole through. It can be improved by allowing a quantity of curtain to stand above the header tape. Once again ensure that you leave twice to three times the length of the opening to give a pleasing finish and to allow the pleats to stand up.

Puff Ball Heading

This is a very impressive curtain heading that is more simple to achieve than you might imagine. You employ the same method as for a slot pleat, allowing at least 12 inches of fabric above the slot. The curtain is then fed onto the pole and the excess above the header tape is simply balled up into a puffball shape.

Whichever curtain header you decide to use you can be sure that a little time and effort will impress visitors who look into and out of your windows.