How to Protect an Interior Wood Threshold

Thresholds are sometimes unnoticeable. Not every doorway has them and those that do don’t always stand out. However, thresholds can be a nice addition to a doorway, especially if the floor at both sides is distinctively different from its neighbor and needs a separation barrier instead of abruptly meeting each other.

They can also be good for stopping drafts or preventing air, either warm or cool, from escaping or entering.

But what kind of maintenance do indoor thresholds need?

There are several things to consider such as staining, sealing with urethane, or painting. Each is a possibility but the final decision depends on you. The truth is a threshold needs some kind of coating to protect it from getting dirty, being marked up, or damaged.

If you have hard wood floors you could stain the threshold:

1. Lightly sand the threshold leveling it out on all sides.

2. Prepare stain.

3. If you want to match the color of the hard wood floor apply stain slowly in coats.

4. Once you’ve finished apply a sealer giving it several coats for extra protection.

If you want to paint the threshold:

1. Lightly sand the threshold leveling it out on all sides.

2. Prepare paint. It should be oil-based for the best shine and to be longer lasting.

3. Apply at least two coats letting it dry in between.

4. Once you’ve finished apply a sealer giving it several coats for extra protection.

If you like the wood color of the threshold you may want to leave it in its natural state. In that case you should still give it a varnish to protect from foot traffic.

1. Lightly sand the threshold leveling it out on all sides.

2. Prepare oil-based varnish.

3. Apply at least two coats letting it dry in between.

Finally add some caulking around the edges of the threshold to prevent dirt from getting caught in any open spaces. After all, the threshold will be crossed by many feet carrying all kinds of gook that may just stick around if given the chance.…

Kitchen & Cooking Safety – Tips To Prevention And Treatment Of Cuts & Wounds, Burns, Falls & Strains

Injury or accident can occur at any place, at any time, be it in the work place or at home. These injuries (in this scope covers the minor injuries likely in a cooking environment) can be possibly prevented, and where it could not but happen can be effectively handled.

Below are the practical measures that should be observed to prevent or at least reduce to the barest minimum: cuts, falls, burns and strains. And where it occurs, some first aid measures (treatments).

Cuts: Always keep knives and use the right knife for the right job.

– Take precaution with sharp instrument; keep your fingers and other parts of your body from blade (sharp edge) or point.

– Keep shield on the sharp edges of tools and when not in use, store away in save place. Never keep knife loose with other cooking implements in a drawer.

– When cutting or chopping, ensure you do that, not on a stainless steel table, not even on your hand but on a board, and away from your body.

– Place a damp cloth under the board, where board slips and never try catching a falling knife.

– Never fool around with knife. Should you pass a knife to another, keep it pointed at the floor and not upwards.

– Wipe knife from the blunt side.

First Aid Treatment:

In the case of a minor cut, rinse wound under a cleaning running water or wash using clean water with an antiseptic like Dettol or Salvon until wound is clean, then put on a protective glove to avoid contamination.

Falls:

– Clean and dry the floor. The floor is usually slippery when wet or when fats, scraps, soap splash and drop or when nylon papers litter the floor.

– Wear non-slip shoes. Let your shoes have a good grip on the floor.

– Look where you walk. Avoid carrying large items as this might block your view and may cause you to lose your balance.

– Be sure to clear your runway of boxes, equipment, hose and wires, etc.

– Keep your mind on what you are doing. Walk purposefully but don’t run.

Strain: this means pulling the muscle in a wrong way or too suddenly, so the muscle gives way. This could be very painful as it can cause damage to the muscle. A strain in a pace like the stomach or chest could cause rupture of the internal lining, which can cause hernia that might require surgery. So

– Don’t lift heavy object without help. Use the trolley instead.

– Bend your knees, not your waist. Keep your back straight.

– Fetch it, don’t stretch for it.

– Don’t show off your strength. Work gradually, don’t go it once. Lift from floor to the chair and then to the counter.

First Aid Treatment For falls and Strains

Make the injured as comfortable as possible, apply cold compress (ice in a cloth). If any doubt about injury, treat as a fracture.

Burns Prevention

Unless …